2017 BCS Awards

The British Cartographic Society is pleased to announce the results of the 2017 Awards as follows:

The British Cartographic Society Award

Winner: Where the Animals Go: James Cheshire and Oliver Uberti

How Baboons Move as One                                         The Albatrosses Circling Antarctica

Judges' Comments: "Well designed maps consistent in style throughout. Pleasing layout and use of text placement. Maps give a fascinating insight into the migration routes and journeys of a wide range of animals. Great to see how biodiversity and maps come together. A huge amount of information very well presented."

Clever and attractive visualisations of multi-scale, multi-dimensional and fascinating geographic data. Good design makes maps easy to understand and beautiful to look at. Huge amounts of information presented succinctly and in an engaging style. Overall product beautifully presented."   

 

Stanfords Award for Printed Mapping

Winner: Dragon’s Back Race: Harvey Map Services

Judges' Comments: "Map is clearly divided into different sections making the route easy to follow. May be useful to repeat key so there is one on each side. The highlighted route is very clear allowing the footpath detail to be shown underneath. The strip design is very effective and ensures the entire route with detail for each day scale is appropriate for the map. A robust map with plenty of appropriate detail required for the task. Good choice by printing it on durable paper in a format easy to follow. Map needed for a purpose – could be life or death situation. Clear mapping and route. Just what is needed!"   

 

Highly Commended: Bedrock Geology of the UK & Ireland: Henry Holbrook, British Geological Society

Judges' Comments: "Great to see an update with additional information for a wider audience. Could be a map to hang at home, school or office. Interested to know if any colour blind techniques have been thought of? Lots of information to get a good picture of the Geology of UK and Ireland. Bright use of colour. Pleasing on the eye. The position of some fault line text overprints the underlying base map text. Fits the criteria ideally for a geological map. Odd use of text masks on some fixtures but not others therefore inconsistent. Some tidying of labels required. Colourful easy to use with useful added town names to aid orientation. Effective generalisation of data."

 

Commended: The Map - Addis: Kirsty Henderson

Judges' Comments: "Very legible map that can be used and used. Clearly made by a person who can communicate a confusing place very effectively. Funny images and text keeping the reader enthralled. Makes me want to visit! Very useful tourist map. Enlarged areas on the reverse aid clarity. Pleasing green areas fade into blue base colour. I really enjoyed exploring this map and the notes that go with it. Well laid out and a great product from little base material. Perhaps it needs a year/date. Illustrations and a ‘hand written’ font for notes makes the map look accessible and friendly. Informed by personal research making this map a very useful piece of information for a visitor. I would imagine this has been well received. Judges were impressed that Kirsty drew the map from scratch adding useful local knowledge by walking the area which enriched the maps detail."

 

Commended: An Historical Map of Kingston upon Hull: Giles Darkes

Judges' Comments: "Clear, concise, understandable and readable. Good product. Good use of colour. The transparency of the colours allows the detail below to be easily seen. A very pleasing map with tons of information to read and explore. Base map low resolution and therefore indistinct. Labels could be heavier or have a larger mask as they are a little lost. Not much visual distinction between purple and black text. Gazetteer well laid out and informative."

 

Commended: A Paddler’s Guide to the Schuylkill River Water Trail: Brian Swisher

Judges' Comments: "A thorough, usable guide for planning and executing a trip along the river – appeals to everyone with lots of associated information, clearly laid out, good clear photography and labels. Maps have all associated contextual information. A very useable guide. The map meets the intended use and portrays a lot of information to plan a river trip. Clear mapping. Good use of mapping within a wider setting – very much enhanced by the explanatory text. Large scale enables clear labelling and plenty of supplementary detail. Facilities clearly shown in individual boxes. Nice to see a drop shadow. Hillshading and drainage don’t always fit."

John C. Bartholomew Award for Thematic Mapping

Winner: Where the Animals Go: James Cheshire and Oliver Uberti

 

Judges' Comments: "Clever and attractive visualisations of multi-scale, multi-dimensional and fascinating geographic data. Good design makes maps easy to understand and beautiful to look at. Huge amounts of information presented succinctly and in an engaging style. Overall product beautifully presented."   

Highly Commended: The Map - Addis: Kirsty Henderson

Judges' Comments: "Very legible map that can be used and used. Clearly made by a person who can communicate a confusing place very effectively. Funny images and text keeping the reader enthralled. Makes me want to visit. Very useful tourist map. Enlarged areas on the reverse aid clarity. Pleasing green areas fade into blue base colour. I really enjoyed exploring this map and the notes that go with it. Well laid out and a great product from little base material. Perhaps it needs a year/date. Illustrations and a ‘hand written’ font for notes makes the map look accessible and friendly. Informed by personal research making this map a very useful piece of information for a visitor. I would imagine this has been well received. Judges were impressed that Kirsty drew the map from scratch adding useful local knowledge by walking the area which enriched the maps detail."

Highly Commended: A Paddler’s Guide to the Schuylkill River Water Trail: Brian Swisher

Judges' Comments: "A thorough, usable guide for planning and executing a trip along the river – appeals to everyone with lots of associated information, clearly laid out, good clear photography and labels. Maps have all associated contextual information. A very useable guide. The map meets the intended use and portrays a lot of information to plan a river trip. Clear mapping. I am unsure how these would be utilised on the rapids. Good use of mapping within a wider setting – very much enhanced by the explanatory text. Large scale enables clear labelling and plenty of supplementary detail. Facilities clearly shown in individual boxes. Nice to see a drop shadow. Hillshading and drainage don’t always fit."

Commended: New York Seascape: Jon Bowen and Debbie Gibbons

Judges' Comments: "User is quickly pulled in to discover the large amount of data shown on this busy, but well-designed product. Layout and general presentation very good, although some categories of information a little difficult to distinguish. Useful supplementary information helps to tell the story."

Commended: The Puzzling Presidential Election: Kenneth Field

Judges' Comments: "Interesting variation on a cartogram which presents the outcome of the election well, and in a quirky way. Innovative Escher puzzle approach is clever, while not detracting from the message. Accompanying interactive version a bit weak and light on supplementary information. Attractive and new cartographic/illustrative style."

Avenza Award for Electronic Mapping

Commended: Shrink Swell HEX Grid map of Great Britain: Clive Cartwright, British Geological Society

Judges' Comments: "Clear way to map many complex issues. Gives a great overall picture of the UK and then locally. An interesting study in generalising data. Why do we need generalised data rather than accurate data? Use of hexagons consistently across range displays information well. Use of colour definitions, the use of related colours in each individual map is visually pleasing. The explanation of the process is useful to aid understanding of the generalisation process. A very good broad-brush approach."

Commended: Imray Navigator: Imray, Laurie, Norie and Wilson Ltd

Judges' Comments: "Reproduction of charts on a mobile device with added navigation tools. Interesting development of hard copy charts. Well thought about for all levels of navigator. App is clear and simple to use with straightforward instructions. It is intuitive to smartphone users. App is available in a wide variety of languages allowing intelligence and flexibility."

Esri UK New Mapmaker Award

Commended: PhD Human Geography: Isabel Williams, Newcastle University

Judges' Comments: "Without background knowledge of the subject it was difficult to understand the map. Judges wanted to know how the surveys were carried out; For instance what time of day, what gender and age were the people who were interviewed, why were the locations of the survey picked. It would help if borders around the survey areas were added to the maps. The work has been given a commended award as it is clear the map is showing a complex study but more information is needed for this work to gain a higher award. However, given the entrant is from a human geography background and works within that context, the entry was deemed to be a very good effort and was a good attempt to visually represent a complex and multi-layer piece of academic work."

Henry Johns Award for the most outstanding article published in The Cartographic Journal

Winner: Projection Wizard – An Online Map Projection Selection Tool: Bojan Šavrič, Bernhard Jenny and Helen Jenny

Judges' Comments: “A genuine contribution to the science and use of map projections that makes theoretical and practical advances for their application in many areas of cartography.”

Ian Mumford Award for Excellence in Cartographic Research

Winner: World Political Map from OpenStreetMap Data: Tomislav Jogun, University of Zagreb

Judges' Comments: "The work is impressive and shows a good grasp of technical issues and of cartographic design throughout. The panel liked Tomislav’s utilisation of OpenStreetMap data to create an attractive world map as part of the project, and that the code has been written under an Open Source and Creative Commons Licence so that it can be shared in future. The choice of a dark colour for the oceans in the finished map may have made the overlaying black labels slightly more difficult to read, but all-in-all, a deserving award winner."